JLR restructure will “dramatically reduce” layers of management

A ‘dramatic reduction’ of management roles will be carried out at Jaguar Land Rover as part of a company restructure.

Plans to reshape the business were revealed by the company’s CEO this week as he also mapped out the Coventry car maker’s electrified future as part of its Reimagine programme.

In his first press conference since taking over the reins from former boss Ralf Speth, Thierry Bolloré revealed Jaguar will become an all-electric brand going forward and the company is working towards a zero carbon future.

He also revealed a planned new version of Jaguar’s flagship saloon, the XJ, would not be produced and that Jaguar production would be centred in Solihull.

Mr Bolloré also spoke of plans to restructure the business in the shape of the Refocus programme and revealed the existing layers of management would be reduced.

He said: “It is critical as we steer through the changes ahead. »



Jaguar Land Rover CEO Thierry Bolloré. Image: Joel Saget/AFP via Getty Images)

Mr Bolloré added: “We will be dramatically reducing the layers of management .

“The central nervous system of our new structure will be a radical digital transformation.

“There will be a rationalisation of our main manufacturing footprint.”

Mr Bolloré did not specify how many jobs might go as part of any reorganisation.

When asked about job losses during a question and answer session which followed the press conference on Monday February 15 he said: “The company is really moving ahead full throttle with its transformation plans.”

The company has subsequently said it was too early to say how many jobs might be at risk.

A Jaguar Land Rover spokesman said: “ Monday’s announcement outlines our future strategy not only including plans for our brands and vehicles, but also how we will reimagine our entire business.

“As we begin our journey to becoming an agile organisation, it’s imperative that we make every possible efficiency right from the start, including finding the right baseline cost for our workforce.

“With a renewed imperative to prioritise value creation through quality and profit-over-volume approach, we will create a flatter structure designed to empower employees to create and deliver at speed and with a clear purpose.

“A full review of the Jaguar Land Rover organisation is already underway.

“We need to reduce the cost base to achieve a lean foundation, which will allow us to transform most effectively into a more agile organisation.”

Mr Bolloré did not announce any plant closures this week but did say the Castle Bromwich plant, currently the home of Jaguar, would be re-purposed with Jaguar production centred in Solihull.

Jaguar Land Rover has three main Midland factories – in Solihull, Castle Bromwich and Wolverhampton.

It also has operations in Whitley, Ryton and Gaydon.

The trade union Unite gave a cautious welcome to Mr Bolloré’s plans for the future.

Unite national officer for the automotive industries Des Quinn said: “Unite understands the need for a re-evaluation of the direction of travel for the Jaguar Land Rover brands and the challenges facing the business given the events of recent years.

“These pressures included the slump in global automotive sales, the fallout of ‘Dieselgate’ and tighter regulation around emissions which have been compounded by lack of confidence due to the Brexit process and the effects of the worldwide pandemic.

“For those reasons, we welcome the Reimagine programme and the vision for the company in the future.

“However, this is not unconditional support. Assurances of no plant closures and no compulsory job losses have been sought and given, and it is on this basis only that we will work with the company to meet the challenges of the future.

“A green and clean future for Jaguar Land Rover and the planet is ‘a must’ so sustainability will be key in everything we do, including world class product development and generating manufacturing employment.

“The Reimagine strategy lays the foundation for an electric future, and the investment and advent of new technology are good news in challenging economic times.”

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